Category Archives: Lin(d)field History

Every Man Remembered – New website to honour all the dead of the Great War

Set up by the Royal British Legion, the new website ‘Every Man Remembered‘ has been set up to honour and commemorate every single man and woman who died in the Great War fighting for Britain and the Empire. It is a really fantastic idea, and as a One Name Family History Society, I feel it is essential we should commemorate everyone from the Lin(d)field families who lost their lives. Donations can also be made to the Legion in memory of an individual. Continue reading Every Man Remembered – New website to honour all the dead of the Great War

A New Website to have a look at: The Great War – West Sussex

With all the First World War centenary commemorations well under way, I wanted to tell everyone about a  new website:The Great War – West Sussex‘.

Financed with a lottery grant, this has been a joint project between the West Sussex Library Service and the West Sussex Record Office, who appealed for volunteers to research case studies on various topics of the war or on a particular serviceman or woman. Far more people came forward than expected – 150 rather than the estimated 80 or so – but the end result is a fantastic learning resource that I can thoroughly recommend. Continue reading A New Website to have a look at: The Great War – West Sussex

The Lindfields of Chailey, Part 3: Katherine – Saint or Sinner?

My father once remarked, when reminiscing about the past that, “most families seemed to have a simple daughter, who was kept at home, to look after the house and care for the elderly parents”. However, despite this, the only unmarried women our researches had discovered so far had been qualified as seamstresses, milliners, and in one case as a teacher. Continue reading The Lindfields of Chailey, Part 3: Katherine – Saint or Sinner?

The Lindfields of Chailey, Part 2: The Story of Sarah Bridger

My curiosity about the elaborate dresses in the old family photograph remained and, to find out more about these, it was necessary to dig deeper into the Miles family. Next to the headstones of Thomas and Rebekah Miles in the Wivelsfield graveyard, stands a memorial to Sarah Bridger which reads, formerly of Burgess Hill, died at Hove, November 28th 1895, aged 62 years. Continue reading The Lindfields of Chailey, Part 2: The Story of Sarah Bridger

The Lindfields of Chailey, Part 1: Hasted Lindfield

In my father’s house there was a photograph, which fascinated me. The picture showed a family in a country garden. The man is standing, holding the hand of a little girl and the woman is seated, with a baby on her lap. Although he is not smiling, the man’s face appeared good-humoured to me, the woman looked more severe. But what stole my attention and always brought me back to gaze again, were the elaborately-fashioned dresses of the woman, the child and the baby. How had these country folk come by such clothes and who had made them? It was not until many years later that I was to learn the answers to these questions. The people were Hasted Lindfield and his wife, Mary Miles, taken in 1872. The infant on the lap was, in fact, a boy and my grandfather, also called Hasted. Mary’s distinctive features were to be handed down through several generations of Lindfields. Continue reading The Lindfields of Chailey, Part 1: Hasted Lindfield

The Isle of Wight Linfields

Sometime during the mid-1850s, Mark Linfield (1825-1909) moved with his young family to the town of Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. Mark was a linen draper1 by trade, and in the 1851 census he is recorded as such at 1, Albert Terrace in Camberwell, with his sister Jane and younger brother Stanford Frederick (1829-89), also a linen draper. Mark and his siblings were all born in Storrington, West Sussex and were the youngest three children of William and Harriet Linfield (née Stanford) who were married in 1803. Both Mark’s father, and grandfather Peter Linfield (1734-91), were farmers and butchers in Storrington, a trade followed by his older brother, Thomas (1812-84). Sadly for Mark, Jane and Stanford, they were orphaned when both their parents died in 1835. They were all still very young – Mark was ten, Jane 12 and Stanford only 6 – so they began life with a distinct disadvantage. They were brought up by older siblings, who no doubt wanted to relieve themselves of the financial commitment as early as possible. And so, by 1841, at the age of 15, it is hardly surprising that Mark is working as an apprentice to Henry Marshall, draper of High Street, Steyning. Continue reading The Isle of Wight Linfields

The Linfields of Coolhurst – an Update

Following the recent publication of my article on the ‘Linfields of Coolhurst’1, I decided to write an adapted version for Horsham Heritage, the journal of Horsham Museum and Horsham Museum Society. Since I would need to write something of interest to a more general audience, it was necessary to exclude many of the family history details. The process of re-writing this article – with useful guidance from Sue Djabri of the Horsham Museum Society – proved to be a very interesting exercise in itself, leading, in fact, to a fundamental re-assessment of some of the ideas expressed in the original. The version which appears in Horsham Heritage2 is therefore rather different to the one which appeared in Longshot. The purpose of this article is to discuss some of the main differences and the reasons behind them, and to look at one or two new ideas which evolved during the process. Continue reading The Linfields of Coolhurst – an Update

The Linfields of Lyndhurst Road, Worthing

Previous articles have been written in this journal about Arthur George Linfield, fruit grower and nurseryman, of Worthing in Sussex and his younger brother, Frederick Caesar Linfield, corn merchant of Worthing and local politician who eventually became a Liberal Member of Parliament. In this article, I intend to write about their elder brother, William Henry Linfield and his family, who lived in Lyndhurst Road near Worthing Hospital. Continue reading The Linfields of Lyndhurst Road, Worthing